Navy Grog ice cone: Lost art is revived by cocktail enthusiasts and a handy gadget

Author and cocktail historian Jeff “Beachbum” Berry solidified his standing as the “Indiana Jones” of Tiki mixology with his first branded product, unearthing a long-lost gadget from the catacombs of mid-century bar culture: Beachbum Berry’s Navy Grog Ice Cone Kit.

See below: Putting the ice cones to the test | Vintage Navy Grog recipe
Related: Jeff Berry proves he’s never too busy to be a ‘Beachbum’
Mai-Kai cocktail review: Even landlubbers can appreciate a strong ration of Yeoman’s Grog
* Buy the Navy Grog Ice Cone Kit now from Cocktail Kingdom

The Navy Grog Ice Cone Kit from Cocktail Kingdom
The Navy Grog Ice Cone Kit from Cocktail Kingdom. (Photo by Hurricane Hayward, August 2013)

The Navy Grog (aka Yeoman’s Grog, Captain’s Grog, et al.) “was one of the most popular drinks until the Mai Tai came along,” Berry said during a symposium at The Hukilau in June 2013. “It’s a lovely combination of three rums, two fruit juices, a little spice, a little syrup.” But just as much as its taste, it’s distinguished by a cone of ice protruding from the glass, neatly encasing a straw. The cocktail emerged in the early 1940s and was a mainstay of Tiki bars well into the 1970s. But as mixology in general, and Tiki cocktails in particular, devolved during the ensuing decades, the ice cone disappeared.

When Berry began gathering recipes for his first book, this technique had been long forgotten. As far as Berry knew, only the historic Mai-Kai in Fort Lauderdale was still serving a drink with a traditional ice cone (a descendant of the Navy Grog called the Yeoman’s Grog) when he put together Grog Log, released in 1998.

Some 15 years and five books later, Berry teamed up with Cocktail Kingdom to create a metal mold that perfectly re-creates a vintage ice cone. The finished product works not only in the Navy Grog, but any drink that fits in an 8-ounce rocks glass as well as a larger Mai Tai glass.

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The Hukilau presents the perfect way to serve up Tiki history in a glass

The Hukilau, the annual Polynesian Pop festival that invades Fort Lauderdale every June, is known for its authentic and eye-catching event merchandise, particularly the mugs and glassware. But when the event is over, that doesn’t mean you can’t pick up some cool retro-themed goodies.
See below: Bonus recipe and winning photo from The Hukilau’s glassware photo contest

Tiki History Glasses (pink/orange) from The Hukilau
Tiki History Glasses (pink/orange) from The Hukilau.

The latest in a series of double old-fashioned glasses featuring historic Tiki locations has just arrived and has begun shipping to those who pre-ordered. They’re available in sets of two ($22) or four ($42).
* Click here to order yours today on TheHukilau.com Web site

This new limited-edition glassware features logos and artwork from these historic Tiki-themed hotels, bars and restaurants: The Hanalei Hotel in San Diego, Luau 400 in New York City, The Mainlander in St. Louis, Johnny’s Tiki Hut in Salt Lake City, and the Inter-Island Resorts in Hawaii. The Hukilau’s co-founder and producer, Christie “Tiki Kiliki” White, has once again done a great job along with Stacie Herndon of Heelgrinder Design in assembling some classic images for the latest in a series of vintage glasses. [See more photos on the Facebook page.]

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Mai-Kai cocktail review: Even landlubbers can appreciate a strong ration of Yeoman’s Grog

Updated July 2015
See below: Our Yeoman’s Grog review | Ancestor recipe | Tribute recipe
Related: Navy Grog ice cone: Lost art is revived by cocktail enthusiasts, handy gadget
Mai-Kai cocktail guide

It goes without saying that The Atomic Grog is a big fan of any traditional “grog,” and the Yeoman’s Grog at The Mai-Kai is one of the best. But where exactly does the the term “grog” come from? And what’s the story behind the Yeoman’s Grog?

Admiral Edward "Old Grog" Vernon. (Portrait by Thomas Gainsborough - from Wikipedia)
Admiral Edward "Old Grog" Vernon. (Portrait by Thomas Gainsborough - from Wikipedia)

In the British Navy, it became tradition in the mid-1600s to grant all seamen a daily half-pint ration of rum. In 1740, seeking to cut down on rampant drunkenness, Admiral Edward Vernon, nicknamed “Old Grog” because of the cloak made of grogram (a silk fabric) that he always wore, ordered the rum mixed with a quart of water. Some years later, when it was proven that citrus fruit prevented scurvy, lime juice was added to the mix. The world’s first proper tropical drink was born, named the “Navy Grog” after Old Grog himself.

Roughly 200 years later, when tropical drinks were all the rage, a greatly enhanced version of the Navy Grog was popularized by Donn Beach (aka Don the Beachcomber) and Victor Bergeron (aka Trader Vic). When The Mai-Kai opened in 1956, mixologist Mariano Licudine created the Yeoman’s Grog, based heavily on Donn Beach’s version, which he knew well from his years working at Don the Beachcomber in Chicago.

But Licudine took the Yeoman’s Grog to the next level by lifting the best element of Trader Vic’s Navy Grog – allspice liqueur, aka pimento dram. This is one of those special, subtle ingredients we’ve noted in past reviews (see the Deep Sea Diver and Rum Julep), but it really takes a starring role here. But, as usual, Lucudine gave it his own special touch (see tribute recipe below).

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