Modern Caribbean Rum

Exclusive preview: The Hukilau 2024 attracts bands, bars and VIPs from around the globe, returns to The Mai-Kai

The Hukilau 2024 attracts bands, bars and VIPs from around the globe, returns to The Mai-Kai

Updated May 21

Proving that the modern Tiki scene is truly a worldwide phenomenon, The Hukilau has lined up one of the most geographically diverse groups of musicians, cocktail and rum experts, bartenders, and special guests in recent memory.

Tickets go on sale at 6 p.m. Monday, March 25, for The Hukilau 2024
Tickets are on sale now for The Hukilau 2024. Go to TheHukilau.com (click the logo).

When the East Coast’s longest-running Polynesian Pop weekender returns for its 22nd gathering in South Florida this June, its guests (aka villagers) will not only get an exclusive experience at the historic Mai-Kai, they will have a rare opportunity to traverse the globe … Hukilau-style.

Where else can you taste spirits with London’s “Rum Ambassador,” then rock out with a Russian band while enjoying tropical drinks from a Paris bartender? Follow that up with classic cocktails and a Tiki history class with an acclaimed New Orleans author and bar owner, poolside parties featuring mixologists from Los Angeles to Cozumel, and live surf and exotica music from Italy and Spain.

You would be hard pressed to find a more diverse group of entertainers and experts at a retro-themed Tiki event. The Hukilau’s organizers are also making a conscious attempt this year to include symposiums that spotlight the cultural diversity prevalent in today’s worldwide Tiki bar scene.

The last time The Hukilau held an event at The Mai-Kai in September 2021, villagers celebrated the sale and upcoming preservation of the Polynesian palace (left). Now, with a reopening likely this summer, organizers are planning special experiences for the 2024 event June 6-9. At right is the new porte-cochère in October 2023 after its reimagination by creative director "Typhoon Tommy" Allsmiller. (Photos by Hurricane Hayward)
The last time The Hukilau held an event at The Mai-Kai in September 2021, villagers celebrated the sale and upcoming preservation of the Polynesian palace (left). Now, with a reopening likely this summer, organizers are planning special experiences for the 2024 event June 6-9. At right is the new porte-cochère in October 2023 after its reimagination by creative director “Typhoon Tommy” Allsmiller. (Photos by Hurricane Hayward)

All this – plus a chance to be among the first to see the restored Mai-Kai – await guests at the June 6-9 event. With the restaurant in the final stages of its multi-year, multimillion-dollar refurbishment, it’s unclear if it will be fully open. But even if not, The Hukilau ticket-holders will get exclusive access and tour. Note: An Aloha or South Seas pass is required to join the tour.

Event tickets are now available via TheHukilau.com website. Rooms are also available for booking at the host hotel, the oceanfront Beachcomber Resort.

Following is a sneak preview:

The Hukilau – June 6-9 at the Beachcomber Resort & Club in Pompano Beach. Featuring live music (Messer Chups, Surfer Joe, L’Exotighost, Slowey and the Boats, Lords of Atlantis, The Intoxicators, The Disasternauts, The Mermers, Skinny Jimmy Stingray), symposiums and classes (Jeff “Beachbum” Berry, Ian “Rum Ambassador” Burrell, David Wondrich, Matt Pietrek, Spike Marble), 20+ guest cocktail bars, pool parties, Tiki Treasures Bazaar, plus more.
More info below: Bands | Presenters | Guest bars | Special events | Hotel
* The Hukilau on social media: Instagram | Facebook page and group

UPDATED PREVIEW
Symposiums, vendors and more announced for 22nd Tiki weekender June 6-9

The Hukilau 2023 featured an authentic Polynesian show on the poolside stage at the Beachcomber Resort in South Florida. (Photo by Hurricane Hayward)
The Hukilau 2023 featured an authentic Polynesian show on the poolside stage at the Beachcomber Resort in South Florida. (Photo by Hurricane Hayward)

This will be the event’s fourth straight year at the lush and tropical Beachcomber in Pompano Beach, just northeast of Fort Lauderdale. The boutique hotel offers a laid-back atmosphere and beachy vibe, which sets The Hukilau apart. There will also be events at The Mai-Kai, with details still to be determined (more info below).

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Minimalist Tiki

Skinny Jimmy’s Picks: The top 5 most sinister surf songs

Skinny Jimmy's Picks: The top 5 most sinister surf songs

Editor’s note: This is the first in a series of special features on instro surf music by Skinny Jimmy Stingray, a guitarist and longtime fan of vintage instrumental rock. This and all of his future columns can be found here.

Skinny Jimmy Stingray performs with his band at Hulaween, The Mai-Kai's annual Halloween party, in October 2013. (Atomic Grog photo)

When the moon is bright and the shadows grow long, sounds that echo send a chill through the night. Nothing echoes quite as ghoulishly as the sound of a reverb-soaked electric guitar.

Let me strike a chord to remind you, the surf guitar world is full of sinister sounding musical creations. The nature of this music lends itself to a foreboding intensity. This has always been a part of my intrigue with instrumental surf guitar. The five songs featured here are only a sampling of a much larger banquet of spine-tingling offerings surf music provides.

1. Peter Lorre by Satan’s Pilgrims

As surf bands go, Satan’s Pilgrims is definitely one of the best out there and has been going strong since the early ’90s. It’s clear that the band is heavily into horror and sci-fi. Peter Lorre is one of my personal favorites. The riffs are ominous, but the music never gets too loud. The lovely, creepy Hammond organ provides the lifeblood that courses through the song. Give it a listen and you will feel what I mean.

2. Unknown by the Vy-Dels

Not much is known about the band but this 1965 song is awesome! Their use of reverb is vital, and the interplay between the lead and rhythm guitars is impeccable. I liked this song so much when I discovered it, I insisted on playing it with my band back in 2013 at The Mai-Kai for Hulaween. It turned out to be a good idea. The band’s obscurity does not undermine the impact of Unknown.

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